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Stroke Care

Clinical excellence combined with respectful delivery of state-of-the art care defines Mercy Health System's stroke programs and sets us apart. Our stroke teams--comprised of board certified physicians, nurses, therapists and social workers--offer an integrated approach to diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of and education about stroke.

When patients display stroke-like symptoms, early diagnosis and treatment are crucial. We are focused on providing rapid diagnosis using the treatment and guidelines developed by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Get With the Guidelines-Stroke program to treat stroke patients when they are admitted to the emergency department.  Our hospitals are equipped:

  • To provide brain-imaging scans which are available 24-hours a day, seven days a week.
  • With Neurologists available to conduct patient evaluations and use clot-busting medications when appropriate.
  • With a rapid response stroke team and specially trained physicians and nurses to administer immediate care.

During and after a hospital stay we provided or connect patients with services needed to begin their recovery and make continued progress. We offer:

  • Stroke education for patients and their families to help them understand stroke, rehabilitation, and prevention.
  • Rehabilitation and therapy services (including physical, speech, and occupational therapy) to help patients regain movement and function abilities
  • Nutrition services to help patients make positive lifestyle decisions.
  • Social work services to help patients and families cope with change.

We also help patients improve their health through smoking cessation, weight management and exercise, and managing diabetes and cholesterol levels.

Emergency Stroke Care

Mercy Health System's comprehensive emergency stroke care ensures quick response to patients’ needs, and includes:

  • Rapid response stroke teams.
  • Specially trained personnel to urgently evaluate and treat stroke.
  • Experienced Emergency Medicine Physicians and Neurologists.
  • Neurology coverage 24/7.
  • Leading-edge imaging services and equipment to diagnose and treat stroke.
  • Acute rehabilitation services which focus on enabling patients to maximize their function.
  • Participation in American Heart Association's/American Stroke Association's Get With the Guidelines-Stroke program to help assure rapid diagnosis and stroke treatment when patients are admitted to the emergency department.

Stroke Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation should begin after the stroke as soon as possible. Our experienced rehabilitation teams work one-on-one with stroke survivors on regaining movement, improving function abilities, and increasing the overall quality of life after a stroke.

Mercy Health System stroke/brain injury rehabilitation services are available on both an inpatient and outpatient basis.

Prevention of Future Strokes

The exceptionally skilled stroke care teams at Mercy Health System also work to prevent secondary strokes through:
  • Aggressive use of medications, such as blood pressure medications, statins and anti-platelets, as indicated in the secondary stroke prevention guidelines.
  • Treatment of atrial fibrillation, a disorder that prevents blood from pumping out completely of the heart and increases the chance of blood clots.
  • Treatment of atherosclerosis, the hardening of the arteries.
  • Identification and treatment of carotid stenosis, the hardening of the neck arteries.

Contact Us

Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital

Stroke Care
610.237.4289


Mercy Philadelphia Hospital

Specialized Stroke Care
215.748.9592

Community Outreach
Stroke Support Group
215.748.9700


Nazareth Hospital

Stroke Care
215.335.7732

Stroke Symptoms

Know the signs of stroke to increase the likelihood that you'll get treatment before it's too late.

If you or someone you know is having any of the symptoms below GET TO A HOSPITAL or CALL 911 IMMEDIATELY to receive emergency care.

Stroke Warning Signs

  • Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially on one side of the body.
  • Sudden confusion or trouble speaking or understanding.
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes.
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination.
  • Sudden severe headache with no known cause.
  • Sudden nausea, fever, vomiting, or having brief fainting spells.

Receiving treatment within the first few hours can greatly reduce the risk of permanent damage or even death.